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June 12th, 2007


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10:17 pm - the word on the Sopranos
I think David Chase is a fucking genius and I don't care who knows nor how profane my emphasis.

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From:kizlj
Date:June 13th, 2007 02:24 am (UTC)
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likewise. didn't see it, but sounded not bad. since no possible ending would make a majority of fans happy, why not do something artistically provocative?

of course, if they make a feature film in a few years and use the open-ended ending to pick up with 'and everyone lived and carried on just like they were, whew thank god we didn't kill off our star character!' *then* I think fans should be pissed.
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From:resk
Date:June 13th, 2007 02:06 pm (UTC)

No planz yet

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The Sopranos creator David Chase maintained Monday that he did not leave the final episode of the series unsettled so he could return with a theatrical movie tying up loose ends. In an interview with the New Jersey Star Ledger, the "hometown" newspaper of Tony Soprano, Chase said that he hasn't thought much about a possible movie. "I never say never. An idea could pop into my head where I would go, 'Wow, that would make a great movie, ' but I doubt it." Chase declined to discuss the final scene, saying, "I have no interest in explaining, defending, reinterpreting, or adding to what is there."
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From:resk
Date:June 13th, 2007 02:07 pm (UTC)

IMDB is your friend

(Link)
SPOILER ALERT: Rocker Steve Perry refused to let The Sopranos creator David Chase use his classic song "Don't Stop Believin'" in the mob show's final scene until he knew the fate of the drama's leading characters. The ex-Journey frontman kept Chase waiting until three days before the long-awaited finale aired in America on Sunday. Perry is a huge Sopranos fan and feared his 1981 rock anthem would be remembered as the soundtrack to the death of James Gandolfini's character Tony Soprano - until Chase assured him that wouldn't be the case. Perry says, "The request came in a few weeks ago and it wasn't until Thursday that it got approval, because I was concerned. I was not excited about (the possibility of) the Soprano family being whacked to 'Don't Stop Believin''. Unless I know what happens - and I will swear to secrecy - I can't in good conscience feel good about its use." And Perry was so true to his word, he didn't even tell his family the song featured in the finale. He adds, "I didn't want to blow it. Even my wife didn't know. She looked at me and said, 'You knew that and you didn't tell me?'"
(Deleted comment)
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From:derspatchel
Date:June 13th, 2007 03:01 pm (UTC)

Re: IMDB is your friend

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Thing is, the regular watchers have built up such an emotional connection to these characters, and even as the last episode of the Sopranos was busy tying up some storylines, it left others intentionally open -- and introduced NEW ones. For those with such an emotional investment in the show and the characters, not getting closure can be terribly frustrating. But life isn't like TV. All your stories don't get conveniently wrapped up all together in one bow. Doors close, windows open, roofs collapse.

Don't stop!

Me, I love it. I think it was one of the gutsiest ways to end a long-running series. If you follow the Tony Gets Whacked theory, following the discussion he had with Bobby Bacala a few episodes previously, then it's a great and morbid illustration of death. There he is, with his family, slightly apprehensive, then -- nothing. Black. Never know what happens to Carm, to AJ's film project, to Meadow's career, what happens to Sil, Uncle Ju, everybody and nobody. All gone.

Whoa that just creeped me the hell out. I'm going to have to look at some pictures of roller coasters to feel better now.
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From:infinitehotel
Date:June 13th, 2007 03:08 am (UTC)
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It was a ballsy move; those last five minutes were the most tense I've ever been watching television.

I just wish the show had lived up to the ending recently; the last two half-seasons were a long slog to not very much.

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From:beth47
Date:June 13th, 2007 06:01 am (UTC)
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heh. i experienced glee. GLEE, i tell you, at the end of the show. (well, of course, right after my brain caught up with what was going on. it took a few seconds.)

(I AGREE WITH THIS POST. and would still like to subscribe to yr newsletter.)
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From:jrw
Date:June 13th, 2007 06:27 am (UTC)
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I was impressed with what looked to me like ballsy artistic audacity.

(I'm one of those weird people who never watched the series, but tuned in for the final episode anyway. So I didn't have a lot invested in what I was seeing.)
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From:jimmystagger
Date:June 13th, 2007 01:59 pm (UTC)
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I have never seen a single episode of "The Sopranos." I grew up on Long Island, I feel no need, I know those people. I think the whole hoo-hah is funny. Is it any worse than when "St. Elsewhere" turned out to be the dream of an autistic kid?!
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From:derspatchel
Date:June 13th, 2007 03:04 pm (UTC)
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The St. Elsewhere ending was whimsical in a twisted kind of way.

The Newhart ending was hilarious and unexpected, but in keeping with the show's kind of humor.

Cheers' ending was bittersweet; the noted End of an Era. "Sorry, we're closed."

The Sopranos' ending was abrupt. Left plots dangling, stories unresolved, the fates of the characters never to be known. Usually this only happens when a show is cancelled in mid-run. David Chase planned this kind of thing out on purpose, which gave him the luxury of really doing it well. I love it.

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