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January 15th, 2006


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12:20 pm - Your thought for the day
That whole "indigo children" stuff is just proof positive we're gearing up to raise ourselves a nation of Mary Sues.

And, in other news, it's Sunday.

(21 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


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From:saint_buddha
Date:January 15th, 2006 05:56 pm (UTC)
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Keith and I have decide we are Indigo Children (we had to google it).
In addition, the criteria would make a great meme. (scroll down: http://www.indigochild.com/)

Seriously, I just don't get it. Are they talking about child prodigies or just assholes? It seems that they don't have to be smart, they just have to feel entitled.
From:archangelsk
Date:January 15th, 2006 06:09 pm (UTC)
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Adolescent introspection and self-absorption, I thought.
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From:mmcirvin
Date:January 16th, 2006 01:56 am (UTC)
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Parental self-absorption and denial, I thought.
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From:annilita
Date:January 15th, 2006 06:34 pm (UTC)
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Crazy Conspiracy Dude had the author of the books on his show many months ago and she was talking about it. Apparently, they are wiser souls who are "differently abled" and will take over the world and exist in a higher sphere of whosits.

When I was teaching, I had a lot of these kids in my "special needs" class. We called them Emotionally Disabled and ADHD and "raised by permissive parents who spoiled them".
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From:cheezdanish
Date:January 15th, 2006 06:13 pm (UTC)
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...whut.
(Deleted comment)
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From:plumtreeblossom
Date:January 15th, 2006 08:16 pm (UTC)
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Personally, I would phrase that "What's the difference between being and indigo child and being an overindulged little shit?"
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From:redtheblue
Date:January 15th, 2006 07:30 pm (UTC)
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This Indigo Children lady has indirectly explained why parents are being warded away from restaurants and coffee shops. In fact, there's already a business catering to families with Indigo Children.
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From:phonemonkey
Date:January 16th, 2006 10:33 am (UTC)
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*snerrrrrrrrrrrrrk*
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From:plumtreeblossom
Date:January 15th, 2006 08:19 pm (UTC)
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we're gearing up to raise ourselves a nation of Mary Sues.

And there's anything the least bit wrong with that?

Signed,
-Mary Sue




;-)
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From:derspatchel
Date:January 16th, 2006 12:42 am (UTC)
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And you're the prettiest girl in all of Hogwarts! :)
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From:phonemonkey
Date:January 16th, 2006 10:34 am (UTC)
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Ooh, I love it when you blink your violet eyes like that.
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From:violacat
Date:January 19th, 2006 01:58 am (UTC)
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Don't you mean emerald eyes? I mean, storm-colored eyes? I mean, sapphire...dammit!
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From:stopword
Date:January 15th, 2006 10:00 pm (UTC)
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See, I kept seeing this phrase, Indigo children, and thought I knew what they meant:

http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjh9u/fugate.html

"It all started over 6 generations ago after a French orphan named Martin Fugate claimed a land grant in 1820 and settled on the banks of eastern Kentucky's Troublesome Creek, with his red-headed American bride, the former Elizabeth Smith, whose skin was as pale as the mountain laurel that blooms every spring around the creek hollows. The Fugates had seven children, four were reported to be blue. The clan kept multiplying. Fugates married other Fugates. Sometimes they married first cousins. And they married the people who lived closest to them, the Combses, Smiths, Ritchies, and Stacys. All lived in isolation from the world, bunched in log cabins up and down the hollows, and so it was only natural that a boy married the girl next door, even if she had the same last name."

Turns out it's less Fortean, more NewAge. Feh.
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From:mmcirvin
Date:January 16th, 2006 01:58 am (UTC)
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yeah, I initially thought people were talking about them, too. I remember reading about them in some science magazine ages ago.
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From:mmcirvin
Date:January 16th, 2006 01:58 am (UTC)
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...Oh, it was actually that particular article, I guess.
(Deleted comment)
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From:phonemonkey
Date:January 16th, 2006 10:34 am (UTC)
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I always think of the kids in Saki short stories.
From:dcart
Date:January 16th, 2006 04:18 pm (UTC)
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I can actually see a kernel of something good in here, but the combination of new agey condescension and spoiled entitlement contained in the web page about this "movement" certainly make it seem like something that will end up being more harmful than good.

Nonetheless, there seems to be a certain bit of Holt inspired "un-schooling" in what they're doing and I fully endorse that kind of educational system. I think we end up with better citizens and more productive people when we're more focused on teaching our kids to think than we are on teaching them to conform.
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From:eeka13
Date:January 16th, 2006 06:42 pm (UTC)
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Exactly. See, I think the whole Indigo thing (which I actually plan to blog about soon) gives a bad name to people who want to raise children to be freethinkers but who can also accept limits and can compromise and so forth. As others have pointed out, the Indigo thing is characterized by entitlement and thinking your kid shouldn't have to take any direction.

I'm a therapist, working mostly with kids, and I see entirely too many of these entitled families. It's like, there has to be a balance. Sure, part of the reason your kid is struggling is, in fact, because the school doesn't understand him. But you're only making things WORSE to teach the kid that he's too good for the school and not have any expectations in terms of taking direction or accepting limits.

These parents seem to have not gotten over their own issues of not having their needs met by school and parents and so forth. It totally fucks up kids to have their parents telling them they're wonderful and perfect and the rest of the world just doesn't understand. I mean, it's validating for a kid to hear that they're having a hard time this year because the teacher doesn't recognize that the kid needs to get up and move around frequently or is a visual learner or needs to be able to ask questions. But then you don't follow that by telling the kid that the teacher is an idiot and the kid doesn't have to try. It's like, unless the teacher is abusive, you still want to instill the basic idea that the teacher is competent and the kid and parent and teacher all need to work together. It makes kids feel really unsafe and confused when the parent is telling them that the teacher, who is the one in charge of keeping them safe and secure most of the day, is an idiot who doesn't understand them. I think there's like almost some Munchausen stuff going on, that these parents enjoy fucking up their kid so they can have a special child who the world doesn't understand.
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From:nathanw
Date:January 16th, 2006 10:39 pm (UTC)
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Every day I get a little bit closer to buying a megaphone, standing on a streetcorner, and blasting out "YOU ARE NOT A BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE SNOWFLAKE".
From:juubou
Date:January 17th, 2006 03:06 pm (UTC)
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Spatch... it's just generational dynamics at work. See Strauss and Howe, "The Fourth Turning". The gen-X nomads have moved on, the millenials that came after them are starting to do theiri thing, and now we're finally getting into the next post-millenial generation as the nomads go off to die in wars, as they always do. The nomads are ignored, the next generation is lavished and loved as a hero (see the Silents).

d00d I've got satellite internet now!
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From:derspatchel
Date:January 17th, 2006 04:57 pm (UTC)
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DUDE.

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